DB Heating & Cooling, Inc. Blog : Archive for the ‘Energy Savings’ Category

Ways to Save Money on Your Cooling Bills This Summer

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

The average length of time a central air conditioner runs over a summer is 6 hours per day, which can mean using approximately 900 kilowatt/hours (kWh) of energy per month. However, you can find a more specific answer for how much it takes to power your AC. If you look at the cabinet of your air conditioner, you’ll find the wattage of your system. Multiply this by the amount of hours you use your AC each day in summer, and you’ll have an idea how much power your system consumes daily. Now take a look at a recent utility bill to find out you’re paying for electricity per kWh. Using basic multiplication, you can determine the monthly estimate of what you’ll pay during the summer to cool down your house.

There are ways to shave money off these bills, however. Here are some tips to achieve a more energy-efficient performance from your AC this summer. DB Heating & Cooling can help you save money with repairs, installation, and air conditioning maintenance in Oradell, NJ.

Tips to lower AC costs this summer

  • Upgrade your thermostat: Thermostat technology continues to evolve, and each advance increases the efficiency of the systems they operate. With a wireless thermostat, you’ll have better control over your AC, capable of turning it on and off remotely, from any spot with Wi-Fi access. Newer thermostats also have more accurate temperature settings than older models: you’ll have increased comfort as well as a reduced need to keep the air conditioner running.
  • Raise the temperature a few degrees: People often set their air conditioning as low as possible, but consider that each degree you set you thermostat below 78°F will raise energy use by 3–4%. The U.S. Department of Energy recommends 72°F as a comfortable temperature for most situations. Also try to avoid AC use during any outdoor temperature lower than 80°F.
  • Change the filter regularly: The air filter prevents debris from entering the AC cabinet and damaging internal components. But if it becomes too clogged, it will cut down on airflow, and this will force the air conditioner to drain more electricity. Replace the filter regularly during the summer.
  • Schedule a maintenance visit: It’s mandatory for an AC to receive an annual check-up and inspection from a professional. This ensures longevity and prevents unnecessary repairs. But it also cleans and adjusts the system so it runs at its most efficient. Even going for just one year without maintenance can mean a 20% increase in energy use in an air conditioner.

Let DB Heating & Cooling give your AC the best start possible for the summer: with a professional check-up and tune-up. Call us today to schedule air conditioning maintenance in Oradell, NJ.

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Teaneck AC Contractor Tip: Green Your HVAC

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Regular Maintenance Avoids High Costs

No matter the energy rating of the appliance, a schedule of simple maintenance and replacement of filters can make a significant difference in its longevity.  A furnace rated at 95% efficient will burn nowhere near that great a rating if the air is blocked and unable to pass through the filter without effort.

Fan belts on the blower motor can loosen over time and become ineffective, forcing the heater to burn longer and hotter to distribute air that should normally breeze through the ductwork.  Working so hard, parts break and the furnace might need replacement.

New Thermostats

If left to our own habits, our Teaneck air conditioners and furnaces might run for hours under unnecessary circumstances because we are not thinking to turn our thermostats up or down.  At the change of seasons, in particular, it may feel warm enough to open a window while the heat is still adjusted to come on at those fresher temperatures that now seem so inviting.

In older homes, the replacement of the old dial thermostats with the newer digital versions can save on energy costs.  Smart phones allow adjustments to thermostats from anywhere in the world for the instance that a cold snap may threaten frozen pipes while we are away on vacation.

Changing World

Tax incentives, climate change and the economics of energy dictate that we look closely at our habits and find ways to conserve our resources. For more information about how HVAC improvements can reduce your energy bills, give DB Heating & Cooling a call today!

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Green Thinking for Green Thinkers: A Guide From Lyndhurst

Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

There are a lot of media stories in Lyndhurst about exciting new green buildings: LEED-certified buildings, net-zero buildings, buildings made out of recycled shipping containers, homes in New Urbanist communities, even “ultra-small” homes. But a new home can be pricey. Fortunately, though, all these innovative green ideas can be applied where you live right now. In fact, going green in your existing home might even be better for the environment than building a brand-new home.

If you wish your home could be LEED-accredited, focus on energy conservation and indoor air quality in your existing home. Upgrade to a high-efficiency furnace and air conditioner and consider adding central air cleaners to your heating and cooling system. Install Energy Star appliances and WaterSense plumbing fixtures.

If you wish you lived in a “recycled” home, get to know your local salvage yard. Many communities have “architectural salvage” shops and recycle/reuse areas in their landfills. When you do your next home improvement project, go shopping at your landfill first. This is not only great for the environment; it’s also great for your budget. Plus, you’ll end up with a creative, unique home. (Of course, make sure that you don’t re-use items containing lead, asbestos, or other contaminants.)

If you wish you lived in a New Urbanist community, start walking and biking in your own community. Experiment with replacing some of your car trips with walking or biking trips. If you find that your community isn’t pedestrian- or bike-friendly, work with local politicians to change this. Learn about your local public transportation options to see if you can fit them into your lifestyle. If you’re in the market for a new home, make location and proximity to work and shops a primary consideration.

If an “ultra-small” home looks like fun but seems impractical as a long-term residence, consider reducing the size of your own living space. If your kids are grown, it may be time to downsize to a smaller home that uses less energy. If you’re building a new home or an addition to your current home, build only what you need. Sometimes the greenest building decision you make can be deciding to build less.

(The “Not So Big House” website (http://www.notsobig.com) is a great resource for those interested in downsizing while maintaining a high quality of life.)

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